jewelry designers

"My design process starts with the diamond ... how am I going to create my design around it? And then I really think about what's wearable because I want it to feel like a part of my lifestyle, and so I think about comfortability and wearability. Certainly, anything that's going into my collection is being worn at every stage of the game."
"My first memory of diamond jewelry was probably sneaking into my mother's room, stealing all of hers — something I still do."
"When women wear jewelry, I want them to feel happy, even empowered. If you wear something that also is special for you, it's like it's a reminder. It's like you are wearing your lucky charm," says Hearts on Fire's Ilaria Lanzoni.
"The idea that you can have wealth, personal wealth, that you can just adorn on your body and enjoy that doesn't have carrying costs like a piece of real estate, and it still has value — I don't know if there's any other consumer product or luxury product that you get that from [but diamonds]. In this day and age, you can sell a bag, right? But that bag needs to essentially be unworn because if you're going to wear and love that bag, it's not sale-able anymore."
Watch New York City-based jewelry designer Lauren Addison teach you how to perfectly pair your diamond rings and get that hard-to-achieve layered look.
"I got into the diamond industry for my love and huge desire to have as many diamonds as I could collect," Sara Weinstock tells us. It's why you'll never see this Los Angeles-based designer without a fabulous stack of diamond bracelets or rings on, each expertly put together in a way that's just as individual to Sara as the diamonds themselves. Watch Sara's tips for stacking bracelets.
I think we can all agree: nothing adds lift to a look like diamond jewelry. The question is what diamond jewel do you choose now?   Maybe you already have classic pieces, like diamond studs or a tennis bracelet, in your collection and you are looking for something new. Perhaps classics are not your thing....
If you look around at the diamond jewelry that’s available for purchase today, it’s obvious that a good majority of it is being designed for women, by women. The 1930s through the mid-20th century saw the daring imagination of talents such as Juliet Moutard and Suzanne Belperron, both who started their careers at Boivin and...
"Diamonds are inspiring for many reasons. They come in all shapes and sizes, they all have their unique characteristics about them."